Home Blog Page 3

¿Wappin? Music for a rainy last day of May

0
father and son
Father and daughter, in the congo dancing fashion.
Archive photo by Eric Jackson.

Sonidos para el 31 de mayo

May 31 sounds

Yomira John – Mama Congo
https://youtu.be/C48fi2qtKn8

Bob Marley – Redemption Song
https://youtu.be/15_fvQr1pWQ

Ronald Reggae – Jamaican Rhapsody
https://youtu.be/WHho3_ZRKZ0

Kafu Banton & El Almirante – Ella
https://youtu.be/U2ULizf1Meg

Sabrina Claudio – Messages From Her
https://youtu.be/7fitwnziTfA

Juanes & Alessia Cara – Querer Mejor
https://youtu.be/mQ4o4Wcda_s

Jefferson Airplane – Eskimo Blue Day
https://youtu.be/AcqBLlZvkBE

Bunbury – El rescate
https://youtu.be/5ItCxKd3cy4

Samantha Fish – Either Way I Lose / Somebody’s Always Trying
https://youtu.be/kr_iMKjHaqo

Aterciopelados – Bolero Falaz
https://youtu.be/sUlsTs2ljaE

Bob Dylan – Changing of the Guards
https://youtu.be/qZhMvLuoMaM

Eurythmics – Here Comes The Rain Again
https://youtu.be/TzFnYcIqj6I

Luci & The Soul Brokers – Dear Baby
https://youtu.be/kbOUG9SFkig

Pointer Sisters – Slow Hand
https://youtu.be/dbk29JZdl5A

Shawn Mendes live Primera Fila YouTube concert
https://youtu.be/5YuKiJBWeJk

 
~ ~ ~
These announcements are interactive. Click on them for more information. Estos anuncios son interactivos. Toque en ellos para seguir a las páginas de web.
 

npp

 

FB CCL

 

FB_2

 

Tweet

 

Tweet

 

$$

 

vote final

 
Dinero

Six against, one abstention: Backdated copper mine contract dies

0
double talk
One public version in English, another in Spanish, a third for the government. Panamanian labor law says that no more than 10 percent of a company work force in this country can be non-citizens. But PRD legislator Crispiano Adames alleges that of nearly 10,000 people who are or were employed in building the copper mine in Donsoso, only 1,300 were or are Panamanian. The company created a company union with its mostly imported work force, was opposed by Panama’s SUNTRACS construction workers’ union and then demanded government intervention to smash SUNTRACS. The company lost that strike and legal dispute but tensions persist. Minera Panama ads from online.

After 22 years, an always dubious contract is rejected — for now

by Eric Jackson

Back in 1997, a remnant of the one of the two parties with which Panama started as an independent republic in 1903, the Liberal Party, was playing the usual small party game that’s played here. There were a junior partner in a PRD government that had come into office with just a little more than one-third of the vote. The object of such alliances are neither ideological nor about any particular policy imperative — they are business propositions about jobs, contracts and concessions for their leading members. And US-educated Canadian and Panamanian dual citizen, Richard Fifer, seemed to have hit the jackpot.

Fifer got a mining concession, for gold, silver and copper, in western Colon province’s Donoso district and some adjacent parts of Cocle province. While a 1969 decree had set a minimum royalty of 6% on the value of all metals extracted from Panamanian territory, Fifer’s concession set the royalty at 2% of gross sales. At the time, few expected that there would be any actual mining, that it was all about stock swindles on Canadian exchanges. Those did happen but eventually one small part of the concession became the Petaquilla gold mine. 

Starting with the birders, environmentalists were appalled. People living downstream from the project, the river that they fished and bathed in now muddy and allegedly tainted with mining chemicals, soon joined in the outcry.

For a time the gold mine created a spike in Panamanian industrial production figures, as gold was poured and exported.

And on the cost side of the ledger? The environmental impact study for the project was a prototypical bad joke, but there were other established laws, which Fifer said by contract did not apply. He lost that one in court but by and large didn’t do the things required to protect the environment from muddy runoff from deforested land, toxic runoff from chemicals used to separate gold from the rocks in which it is embedded and the social effects which Panama’s environmental studies never really contemplate. Plus, payments into the Seguro Social health care and pension system were deducted from workers’ paychecks but never turned over to the government agency.

Meanwhile, Fifer had other businesses to look after. The Liberals, in their governmental swan song, switched alliances to the Arnulfistas (now, as earlier, called the Panameñistas.) For that switcheroo Fifer got to be governor of Cocle province in the Moscoso administration. Eventually he was removed from that post by the demand of his own party, and after the next government came in the Comptroller General noted the disappearance of foreign aid funds for a museum in Penonome and a bunch of no-show employees who were on the gobernacion’s books. From the governor’s office Fifer got a somewhat lateral transfer to the Panama Canal Authority, under the then Minister of Canal Affairs, one Ricardo Martinelli.

Fifer was in the political out crowd during the following Martín Torrijos administration, but was influential enough so that when criminal charges were threatened over the missing museum funds he went underground for a few days to avoid arrest, raised the missing money and paid it back, such that he was allowed to go on his merry way. The payroll issue lingers to this day — he was slated to go on trial for that last October but it seems that illness put the case off for the foreseeable future.

And the gold mine project proceeded, with alarms being sounded from several quarters.

In the Martinelli administration came gold production, the international pump and dump stock swindle that the ex-president ran with Petaquilla shares, an eventually abortive deal with Spain’s Andalusia region to revive an old Roman gold mine, financial collapse but before that the separation and sale of most of the concession to international mining companies, first to INMET, which in turned flipped to First Quantum, the parent company of the current copper mine project.

The copper mine is a much larger and more serious proposition. No minor league flim flam here — world copper prices have rebounded and First Quantum is serious about extracting and selling it. But it all rests on the 1997 contract.

Nearby farmers say that they piva palms, on which they depended for both food and cash, no longer fruit. If the burden of proof is upon them to establish a link with the mine, they don’t have the resources or access to do that. But a huge chunk of the Meso-American Wildlife Corridor that was established by treaty among seven nations has been, as the Panamanian euphemism would have it, “cleaned.” Might the messy living things swept away been the tiny creatures that pollinated the piva palms? That’s one hypothesis.

Environmentalists, most especially the Environmental Litigation Center (CIAM), have been in court. Not especially about the pivas, but about the flawed 1997 environmental permit, especially now that First Quantum has found molybdenum in the mix and plans to separate out and sell that precious substance that among other things is used for electrical conducting ink on computer circuit boards.

CIAM’s claim was that the environmental issues of mining and separating gold are one things, copper another, and molybdenum — unmentioned in the original concession contract — is yet a third set of problems. As in, First Quantum, whose copper mine is set to go into production within a few weeks, is operating on an invalid environmental permit. 

Last fall the Supreme Court agreed with CIAM and struck down the 1997 concession contract. However, the Varela administration and First Quantum treated that as a minor glitch and mine construction work continued.

The legal fix was to pass a retroactive law to legalize what had been done more than 20 years ago. That’s what President Varela put on the special legislative session agenda, and which the lame duck Economy and Finance Committee rejected by a 6-0  vote, with one abstention, on May 29. That idea is dead.

Or shall we say dormant? The Vice President-elect, José Gabriel Carrizo, was the lawyer for Petaquilla when the original concession contract went through. President-elect Nito Cortizo is trying to be friends with the Chamber of Commerce and other business groups that are screaming about the legal security of foreign investments in the wake of last year’s court decision and the the legislature’s rejection of Varela’s fix. The hole in the ground is about to start creating copper and money. Look for the incoming administration to renegotiate rather than cancel.

It should actually be a test of Cortizo’s business acumen. If, as many claim, First Quantum had broken Panamanian labor laws and given grossly inaccurate numbers in its defense, think about what that might mean. If it’s two percent, or six percent, of gross sales that are owed to Panama, by whose count? The company had this sort of problem with Zambia, which claimed that it had been short-changed by billions. There are ways for governments to monitor such things, even in the face of ideological objections that looking after the public revenue is anti-business.

 

These links are interactive — click on the boxes

 

npp

 

npp

 

vote final

 

npp

 

FB_2

 

Tweet

Lilliston & Bendib, Taking farmers for a ride

0
rassle-o-gram to the world
Trump’s trade disruptions are inflicting real pain, but they’re also exposing the frailty of an agriculture economy built for big business. Cartoon by Khalil Bendib.

Over the last year, President Trump has taken farmers on a roller coaster ride that’s finally gone off the rails.

Escalating trade fights have kicked farmers, already mired in a five-year slump, in the gut. Now, the administration is working up a new trade aid package, while simultaneously opposing aid for farmers recovering from recent Midwest flooding.

What’s going on? If there’s a plan, it’s hard to see from here.

Just in the last few weeks, Trump tweeted a dramatic escalation in new tariffs on China, which immediately announced an escalation of tariffs on US goods, including agriculture products.

A week later, without notice or explanation, Trump ended steel tariffs (based on dubious national security concerns) on close trading partners Mexico and Canada. Yet the same day, Trump signed an executive order threatening new auto tariffs on Japan and the European Union.

If the auto tariffs move forward, Japan and the EU will almost certainly retaliate with tariffs on, you guessed it, agricultural products.

In a hasty attempt to put a Band-Aid on these self-inflicted wounds, the Trump administration is proposing another round of trade aid for farmers. The new round comes after promising that a $12 billion trade aid package last year would be a one-time thing, because a China trade deal was just around the corner.

But, surprise surprise, it wasn’t. So the administration backtracked and recently unveiled another $16 billion aid package for farmers hurt by its policies

The first aid package doesn’t appear to have focused on the mid- and small-sized farm operations that needed it most. The Financial Times found that half of the trade aid money went to just 10 percent of farmers, who used loopholes to elude payment caps.

Moreover, nearly 10,000 people and businesses based in cities — rather than the countryside, where you expect to find farms — accessed the aid. And it was multinational agribusiness firms like Tyson Foods, Cargill, and the Brazilian-owned JBS that benefited when the USDA made large purchases of pork, chicken, and beef.

Trump’s trade disruptions come amid much larger challenges in the agriculture economy. Rising farm bankruptcies, the loss of thousands of mid- and small-size dairies, farm lenders getting tighter with loans, and plummeting land values are all part of the current crisis.

And when it rains, it pours. A series of extreme, climate-related weather events — severe Midwest floods this year, wildfires and hurricanes last year — also hit farmers. Yet the Trump administration has opposed allowing farmers to access disaster aid from these events.

The drivers of our slumping farm economy are longstanding and structural.

We’re flooding the market — too much corn, soy, wheat, and milk. Meanwhile the government has approved a steady series of agribusiness mergers, leading to less competition and fewer choices for farmers.

Federal Farm Bill programs support this system, which precariously relies on expanding trade. If we don’t grow exports, the system collapses — at least for family farmers. It works just fine for the global agribusiness firms that operate in multiple countries and benefit from below-cost corn and soy.

Trump’s dizzying trade disruptions are inflicting real short-term damage, but they’re also exposing the frailty of an agriculture economy built for big business. Instead, we should be looking for ways to reduce overproduction, lift prices to fair levels that keep farmers on the land, and invest public money in climate resilient strategies on the farm.

A different farm economy is possible, but we must come to terms with past mistakes that created this roller coaster.

 

These links are interactive — click on the boxes

 

npp

 

npp

 

vote final

 

npp

 

FB_2

 

Tweet

STRI, Los justicieros del bosque

0
laying in wait
Para el turno nocturno, los guarda parques generalmente encuentran un lugar en el bosque donde puedan armar un campamento con hamacas. Allí permanecen alertas y silenciosos durante la noche.

Superhéroes ambientales:
Los justicieros del bosque

por Sonia Tejada, fotos de los archivos del STRI

Sigilosos y alertas, los guarda parques pasan las 24 horas del día y los 365 días del año vigilantes de cualquier amenaza al bosque y los animales del Monumento Natural Barro Colorado.

A mediados de abril, Mario Santamaria navegaba una lancha negra por el canal trasero de la isla Barro Colorado, el lado que no suelen ver los visitantes a la estación del Instituto Smithsonian de Investigaciones Tropicales. Salvo un canal estrecho por el que pueden transitar pequeñas embarcaciones, esta área del lago Gatún es una pradera de troncos petrificados que sobresalen del agua, retazos de un antiguo bosque que se inundaría para crear el cuerpo de agua que alimenta al Canal de Panamá.

Mario es el supervisor de los 17 guarda parques que custodian el Monumento Natural de Barro Colorado, un área protegida desde 1977, que incluye la isla y cinco penínsulas aledañas. De no ser por su ellos, que en los años noventa —y a lo largo de diez años—, se sumergirían con sierras a cortar los troncos manualmente y a pulmón, hoy los científicos no podrían acceder tan fácilmente a algunas de las islas y penínsulas circundantes.

Mario disminuye la velocidad. Los niveles del lago están muy bajos después de la temporada de verano, al punto que algunos de los troncos cortados están muy cerca de la superficie del agua. De vez en cuando, el fondo de la lancha se golpea con alguno. 

poacher patrol
La tarea principal de los guardabosques es buscar señales de cazadores. Las ramas dobladas, por ejemplo, son un truco de los cazadores para señalizar su camino por la noche. Otro tipo de evidencia son las huellas, municiones gastadas y restos de alimentos.

Vestidos en camuflaje, con botas de suela metálica, para protegerse de las espinas, y una mochila equipada para sobrevivir en el bosque, dos guarda bosques y un policía ecológico se bajan en la península de Bohío Norte para hacer una ronda. En cada turno hay un equipo así.

Caminan por los senderos del Monumento Natural y los despejan de árboles caídos. También le dan mantenimiento a las cercas que delimitan el área protegida. Pero principalmente van tras la pista de los cazadores, alejándose de los caminos para adentrarse en el bosque.

Los cazadores son cautelosos, pero los guarda bosques de Barro Colorado tienen el olfato adiestrado. En especial los veteranos que empezaron hace tres décadas, a la par de Mario. La mayoría eran jóvenes del interior del país, varios con formación en biología. Sin mayor supervisión, fueron construyendo poco a poco, y a partir de sus propias experiencias, el programa de conservación que existe actualmente.

“Soy de Soná en Veraguas. Mi papá era cazador, agricultor, tenía armas y perros. Aprendí sobre las distintas modalidades de cacería, a reconocer las huellas de los animales”, recuerda Mario. Luego señala un árbol cercano, con la corteza cortada en ambos lados del tronco. En el camino también hay ramas dobladas. Son técnicas que utilizan los cazadores para guiarse durante la noche en el bosque. Otras evidencias son las huellas frescas, municiones vacías o restos de comida. Están muy pendientes además de los árboles frutales en temporada y las fuentes de agua que atraen a los animales.

four
El Monumento Natural Barro Colorado tiene 17 guarda parques que patrullan la isla y sus cinco penínsulas circundantes las 24 horas del día, durante todo el año, con el apoyo de seis policías ecológicos. Mario Santamaría, que comenzó a trabajar allí en los años ochenta, es su supervisor.

Cuando encuentran alguna pista, los guarda bosques pueden permanecer varios días en el bosque, a la espera de que regresen. Identifican un lugar cercano al camino de los cazadores y allí arman el campamento donde se mantendrán alertas durante la noche.

Para muchos, este es el aspecto más desafiante del trabajo: simplemente esperar, quietos, sin hacer ruido, en la oscuridad. Porque el bosque nocturno es silencioso y cualquier sonido, por insignificante que sea, se escucha a lo lejos. Inclusive los olores extraños, como el repelente, o el suavizante de ropa, pueden alertar al cazador.

La mayoría de los cazadores ingresan en las penínsulas cercanas a la isla de Barro Colorado porque colindan con poblaciones en tierra firme de Colón y Panamá Oeste. Para mantener una buena relación con estos pobladores y educarlos sobre el trabajo que realizan en el Monumento Natural, los guarda bosques les organizan actividades deportivas y culturales, así como giras médicas. Quieren desincentivar la cacería por medio de la educación, y ganarse la confianza de las personas, a cambio de información valiosa.

Los niveles de cacería se han reducido considerablemente desde los años ochenta, pero solo en abril de este año atraparon y remitieron a las autoridades a dos grupos de cazadores con armas. Uno llevaba un pecarí, de las presas más codiciadas. Las leyes que castigan la cacería ilegal también han avanzado. Antes era una falta administrativa, con una multa menor a la ganancia por la venta de la carne. Ahora es un delito ambiental que puede acarrear años de cárcel o una multa más significativa.

Para Mario es casi una violación a su espacio personal. “Cuando entran los cazadores al bosque siento que están invadiendo mi casa”, se expresa. Y aunque lo indigna, y muchas veces tiene que recurrir a la persecución o manejar situaciones en que los cazadores podrían reaccionar de forma violenta, admite que luego intenta concienciarlos. Al final, el objetivo no es castigar por castigar, sino proteger la naturaleza a largo plazo.

Para los guarda bosques, la principal motivación para enfrentarse a los cazadores y a las inclemencias del tiempo, a pasar noches en vela, sacrificar los días feriados y estar expuestos a especies transmisoras de enfermedades es su amor por la flora y fauna de Barro Colorado y la paz que les brinda el mundo natural.

“La supervivencia del ser humano depende de la naturaleza y cuidarla es una labor noble”, dice el guarda bosques veterano Gabriel Ábrego, durante el turno nocturno, mientras toma una bocanada para llenar sus pulmones. “Además, ¿en qué otro lugar podrías encontrar aire tan puro como el de aquí”

patol boat
Antes de salir a patrullar en lancha, deben asegurarse de que cumpla con todos los requisitos de seguridad, desde tener un extintor y una soga hasta verificar el buen estado del motor.

~ ~ ~

Estos anuncios son interactivos. Toque en ellos para seguir a las páginas de web

 

Dinero

 

Tweet

 

Tweet

 

FB esp

 

FB CCL

Corozal’s old Silver Roll cemetery — despite all efforts not forgotten

0
two graveyards
Two Corozal graveyards — the Panamanian-run old Silver Roll Canal Zone burial ground
in the foreground, with the US-run American cemetery behind that. SERTV photo.

Living memory in a place that would forget

Editor’s note: The old Canal Zone was always racially segregated, although that began to break down a bit during the Republican administration of an old soldier who had served here and knew about Panamanian and Canal Zone society, Dwight D. Eisenhower. Where the mainly West Indian majority of the Canal Zone’s civilian population and the American minority of that enclave’s civilians were buried remained segregated until the end in 1979, when the white section of the Corozal Cemetery was deeded to the United States and became the American Cemetery and the nonwhite section was turned over to Panama.

Panamanian mainstream culture has attitudes that are very different from both North American and Antillean ones regarding cemeteries. The contrasting values are of a vanity service business for families and of a priceless repository of a community’s history.

At the outset US citizens who worked for the Panama Canal were paid in gold and all other employees in silver, such that even after that method of payment lapsed the Gold Roll versus Silver Roll distinction and often nomenclature survived.

When Panama City tried to turn the Silver Roll graveyard into a business, it not only was unprofitable but the practice of digging up the remains of people whose families had not paid was taken as quite offensive by a lot of people, many of them families of the deceased who had relocated to the United States.

Eventually that part of the Corozal Cemetery was declared a national historical monument and put in the care of the National Cultural Institute (INAC), which was not given an appropriate maintenance budget and on some shifts run by rabiblanco socialites who could not care less. It has been left to volunteers to maintain the cemetery as well as possible. The police academy cadets will cut the grass when it gets overgrown. There are other Panamanian volunteers. Mostly, though, the cemetery has  been adopted by the Afro-Antillean community here and in the States, and Friday is one of their periodic graveyard cleaning and maintenance days.


Corozal silver roll
Click on / Toque en cgmcemeteries@gmail.com
 

These links are interactive — click on the boxes

 

npp

 

npp

 

vote final

 

npp

 

FB_2

 

Tweet

Memorial Day 2019 at the American Cemetery

0
wreaths
Civilian participation was down and diplomatic representation was downgraded on this overcast morning when the traffic coming into the city was medium-insane, but the number of organizations represented with wreaths was up this year. There were floral offerings from the US Embassy, the American Battle Monumens Commission, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the VFW Auxiliary, Democrats Abroad, Republicans Abroad, the American Society of Panama, the Boy Scouts of America, Harley Davidson Panama, American Legion Post #2, the Association of the US Army, Elks Lodge #1414, the Scottish Rite Bodies, the Abou Saad Shriners, and the Attaché Association. Photo by Eric Jackson.

The collective memory lives

by Eric Jackson

One might talk demographics, or politics, or urban policy, or what’s a holiday and what isn’t in Panama, to explain why this was a Memorial Day with a slightly reduced American civilian turnout and no American ambassador speaking. All of that would be relevant, but it would all be rude, too. This was a day to remember, for both old soldiers and old antiwar protesters, for Americans across the political spectrum and friends of a bunch of other nations to pay homage and take stock of what has gone before. There are other occasions on which to argue about what it all means.

Those of us who showed heard beautiful music from the Bombero Band. We paid special respects to the late Chief Warrant Officer 2 Isaias E. Santos, who died at the controls of an Apache helicopter in Iraq and whose mother was present at the ceremony. We heard the invocation, benediction and prayers of Reverend Key Martin, the reading of the presidential proclamation by US Navy Commander Ivan Villescas, an address by the embassy’s deputy chief of mission Elias Baumann and the words of guest speaker Colonel Javier Cardona

pipers
The Bombero Band’s bagpipers played Amazing Grace before the benediction.

salute

Gold Star mother

service branches


deputy chief of mission

bombera shows respect

hallowed ground
 

These links are interactive — click on the boxes

 

npp

 

npp

 

vote final

 

npp

 

FB_2

 

Tweet

Corales antiguos: Una máquina del tiempo

0
STRI core
Al sumergirse en las vidas pasadas de los arrecifes de coral, un ecologista histórico podría proteger nuestros arrecifes actuales de los impactos humanos. Con ayuda del equipo del laboratorio O’Dea, Jon marcó y cortó el tubo en segmentos más pequeños y manejables. Foto por STRI.

Una máquina del tiempo al pasado de los océanos

por Sonia Tejada — STRI
English version here

Una primera mirada a Jon Cybulski podría no revelarnos que no es una criatura tropical, sino del noreste de Estados Unidos. Con pantalones cortos y una camiseta sin mangas, sale del Laboratorio Marino de Naos del Instituto Smithsonian de Investigaciones Tropicales (STRI) para encontrarse con un taxista que le vende un almuerzo tradicional de fonda panameña.

Brevemente en Panamá por una beca de corto plazo en el laboratorio de Aaron O’Dea en STRI, a Jon se le puede encontrar buceando en el otro lado del mundo, entre los diversos arrecifes de coral de Hong Kong. Como ecologista histórico y estudiante de doctorado en la Universidad de Hong Kong, está tratando de entender cómo se veían estos arrecifes de coral en el pasado, cómo cambiaron a través del tiempo y por qué. Y como joven explorador de la National Geographic, intenta descubrir cómo la extracción de colonias de coral, históricamente utilizadas para producir cal para edificios y exportación, impactó en los ecosistemas de arrecifes en ese lado del mundo.

En Panamá durante gran parte de la temporada seca, Jon participó en expediciones de buceo que le permitieron explorar los mares alrededor del archipiélago de Las Perlas e isla Coiba, ambas en el Océano Pacífico. Más específicamente, se asomó al mundo que se encuentra bajo el fondo marino, uno que se remonta a miles de años atrás y tiene muchas historias que contar.

Al igual que nuestros suelos, el fondo marino está formado por capas de sedimento acumulado a lo largo del tiempo. Esto incluye partículas de carbonato de calcio, de distintos tipos y tamaños, como fragmentos de coral, conchas de microgastrópodos, espinas de erizo de mar, algas calcificantes y otolitos de peces. Estos carbonatos pueden fecharse, para entender mejor cómo se desarrollaron los ecosistemas marinos a través de los tiempos, incluyendo la diversidad y abundancia de especies en diferentes épocas del pasado. En cierto modo, actúan como una máquina del tiempo que nos permite ver cómo eran los antiguos arrecifes de coral, miles de años atrás.

“Como ecologistas históricos, nuestra tarea es contar la historia de un ecosistema a través del tiempo y cómo interactuaban las especies dentro de él”, dice Jon.

Para extraer capas de sedimento en los sitios que visitó, Jon se puso su equipo de buceo y descendió hacia el fondo del océano con tubos de aluminio de más de 6 metros de largo. Con el apoyo de los colegas en la expedición, los empujó hasta enterrarlos completamente en el suelo, los tapó y los extrajo. De regreso en el bote, los tubos se cortaron en secciones. Estas secciones más pequeñas se partieron a lo largo, y se tomaron muestras de las partículas de carbonato de calcio para analizarlas y enviarlas a un laboratorio que determina su edad.

Mientras espera los resultados del análisis de antigüedad, que podría tomar algunos meses, Jon encontró algunos datos inesperados, inconsistentes con investigaciones previas realizadas en el área. Su expectativa era encontrar una interrupción en el crecimiento de los arrecifes, debido a cambios climáticos pasados, pero lo que notó fueron transiciones en los tipos de coral que dominaban los arrecifes, incluyendo rodolita, un tipo de alga dura que se parece al coral.

“Los cambios como este, de corales a algas, son de gran interés para los ecologistas de arrecifes en todo el mundo”, explica su asesor, Aaron O’Dea. “Pero más interesante es ver cómo podrían recuperarse los arrecifes de coral. En estos sedimentos vemos que los corales se recuperan de la dominación de rodolita tres veces durante los últimos milenios. Podría ayudarnos a determinar qué se necesita para que los corales se recuperen”.

Mientras reflexionan sobre estos descubrimientos, tanto Jon como Aaron siguen preocupados por los cambios más recientes en las condiciones oceánicas, producto del impacto humano en el medio ambiente, y por cómo podrían afectar a las especies marinas. No sería la primera vez que el océano enfrentara condiciones distintas, pero en el pasado el cambio fue probablemente más lento que el rápido deterioro causado por los humanos. Con sus datos históricos, esperan guiar a los tomadores de decisiones en el desarrollo de directrices para promover y enfocar la conservación y restauración de corales en áreas vulnerables.

“Estos arrecifes de coral son el hogar de muchas especies marinas. Debemos usar los datos históricos para comparar las condiciones pasadas con las actuales, y luego mirar hacia el futuro, preguntándonos: ¿cómo podemos darles su mejor oportunidad de sobrevivir a los cambios futuros?”, concluye Jon.

~ ~ ~

Estos anuncios son interactivos. Toque en ellos para seguir a las páginas de web

 

Dinero

 

Tweet

 

Tweet

 

FB esp

 

FB CCL

¿Wappin? Cosa nuevas, cosas viejas / New things, old things

0
Max Roach
Old stuff, and new stuff. Certain themes recycle.
Cosas viejas, y cosas nuevas. Ciertos temas se reciclan.

Lest we forget, and lest we get so stuck
on memories that we learn nothing new

Para que no olvidemos, y no sea que estamos tan
atascados en los recuerdos que se aprende nada nuevo

Monalisa & Rodrigo – Within
https://youtu.be/nGfhTYBSohc

Esperanza Spalding – Lest We Forget
https://youtu.be/i21b35DtbIQ

Kany García & Natalia Lafourcade – Remamos
https://youtu.be/hug1NLbLymM

Christina Perri – Tiny Victories
https://youtu.be/TpeWxjtySKU

Juan Luis Guerra – Todo Tiene Su Hora
https://youtu.be/07314LhFag4

Kimberly Thompson – Making the Impossible Possible
https://youtu.be/GHbFSA3MFtw

Stomu Yamash’ta, Steve Winwood & Michael Shrieve – Crossing the Line
https://youtu.be/3inTAomshLs

Babatunde Olatunji – Jin-Go-Lo-Ba
https://youtu.be/ZYhFyF8dvU4

MecániK InformaL – Deja La Takilla
https://youtu.be/ccAk20HKPPg

Romeo Santos & Frank Reyes – Payasos
https://youtu.be/CkNSGnekpBA

Carlos Martínez – El Presidiario
https://youtu.be/gkAdQF42em8

Steel Pulse – Cry Cry Blood
https://youtu.be/aO7fmxoFtIw

iLe – Contra Todo
https://youtu.be/_UqA4_wci04

Rubén Blades & Making Movies – No te calles
https://youtu.be/7OFp3DFyOn4

We Insist! Max Roach’s Freedom Now Suite
https://youtu.be/UsvFzXr-o-8

 
~ ~ ~
These announcements are interactive. Click on them for more information. Estos anuncios son interactivos. Toque en ellos para seguir a las páginas de web.
 

npp

 

FB CCL

 

FB_2

 

Tweet

 

Tweet

 

$$

 

vote final

 

Trump sent us a credentials fraud guy to sow suspicion about Chinese people

0
fake
Do the statements look bona fide? They fooled the editor of The Panama News before a tipoff. Copied, with ad extracted, from https://www.americasquarterly.org/content/mauricio-claver-carone

What else might you expect from
an administration of grifters?

by Eric Jackson

Any journalist with a conscience does not like to be wrong, but will run a correction when she or he is. In the ultra-paid corporate mainstream news organizations, which these days tend get the basic story from the piranha school of small publications and they use the managements’ connections to get the high and mighty to talk with them, admission of error usually mean loss of job. It’s one of the reasons why ever more people are alienated from Jeff Bezos’s rag, Carlos Slim’s rag, the interlocking television network / war industries directorates and so on.

Anyway, Trump sent a guy here to stoke up suspicion of the Chinese — in a land with a sordid history of anti-Chinese racism — and this reporter objected in an editorial. But some of this reporter’s research included bogus claims about the envoy’s credentials, and those claims were repeated. See the email exchange that follows.

Will Trump have to send someone else to enlist Panama in his administration’s foreign policy feuds?

Mauricio Claver-Carone/Catholic University

<lozoya@cua.edu>
Fri, May 24, 2019 at 10:50 AM
To: fund4thepanamanews@gmail.com

Dear Editor,

I am writing to ask you to make a small correction to this editorial that I found online here:

http://www.thepanamanews.com/2019/05/editorial-trumps-envoy-incites-anti-chinese-racism-here/

In the editorial it states that Mauricio Claver-Carone is a professor of Law at The Catholic University of America. He is an alum of our law school, and early in his career he taught classes here, but he has never had tenure here as a professor of law here. He has not taught any classes here recently.

Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Sincerely,
Karna Lozoya

Karna Lozoya
Executive Director of Strategic Communications
Office of the President
202 319-6748
catholic.edu

~~

<fund4thepanamanews@gmail.com>
Fri, May 24, 2019 at 11:48 AM
To: <lozoya@cua.edu>

Got it. My source was a brief biography in Americas Quarterly, at
https://www.americasquarterly.org/content/mauricio-claver-carone

But to me the first principle of journalism is truth, not what you can
get past the legal system without spending a lot of money defending
against those who invoke Panama’s benighted criminal defamation laws.
Same as when I was writing for the alternative press in Michigan and
on the staff of the Detroit College of Law Review, way back when. So
the correction will be run.

Eric Jackson
The Panama News

~~

<lozoya@cua.edu>
Fri, May 24, 2019 at 1:27 PM
To: <fund4thepanamanews@gmail.com>

Hello Eric,

Interesting. I am going to check further to see if it’s true that he was a full-time professor. I don’t think so. I do know he doesn’t teach here now.

Thank you for the correction.

Best to you,
Karna

~~

<fund4thepanamanews@gmail.com>
Fri, May 24, 2019 at 1:43 PM
To: <lozoya@cua.edu>

You know, in Panama academic and credentials fraud are national
sports. I once became persona non grata with the Presidencia for
pointing out that the president who called himself “Dr.” had no
doctorate, and at the University of Panama for pointing out that the
rector had purchased his doctorate from the Complutense when that
Spanish university used to sell diplomas to foreigners during the
Franco dictatorship.

Am I just being a snob because even though I am a poor man I have TWO
JDs — the law degree and the juvenile delinquent record?

As a Panagringo dual citizen looking on from afar, what I see in US
society at all levels, and among the American community here, too, is
a descent into banana republic standards. A presidential envoy with
inflated credentials? It would not surprise me.

If you go back to the story you may notice the correction.

Eric

~~

<lozoya@cua.edu>
Fri, May 24, 2019 at 1:49 PM

To: <fund4thepanamanews@gmail.com>

Thanks Eric, I confirmed that he was only a clinical assistant. That’s what our records show.

He is an alum. That part was true.

Again, thanks for the help.

Karna

President Varela and Mr. Claver. US Embassy photo.
 

These links are interactive — click on the boxes

 

npp

 

npp

 

vote final

 

npp

 

FB_2

 

Tweet

Isla Bona left off of the special session agenda

0
bagels and Bona
On May 23 a good-sized crowd for Panama’s relatively small environmentalist movement showed up at the New York Bagel Cafe on Via Argentina for a forum on Isla Bona. CIAM, Panama’s environmental law center, and other guest presenters explained the situation and set their sights on the next moves. Much will depend on where Nito Cortizo and the new PRD majority in the National Assembly stand and whether the oil terminal’s promoters, Bona  Pacific Corporation, spend the next month killing off the island’s birds and vegetation to present accomplished facts to the next government. Photo from CIAM’s Twitter feed.

This legislature won’t save Isla Bona’s wildlife, but that may not be the end of it

by Eric Jackson

President Varela has put out the call for the last special legislative session he will call. Making a wildlife refuge of Isla Bona — a speck of land about 28 nautical miles from the Panama Canal’s Pacific entrance and about 10 nautical miles from Taboga, in which municipal district it is a part — will not be on the agenda.

So does that leave things in limbo, or is it something more definitive?

Notwithstanding the efforts of the world’s maritime shipping industry and UN agencies that regulate it to reduce the carbon emissions of seagoing vessels, a company named Bona Pacific Corporation wants to turn the island into a petroleum fuels terminal. The publish quite the greenish website to defend what they intend.

The company got Ramón Ramos, the mayor of Taboga, to sign a lease agreement with the Panamanian company of apparent Israeli ownership and management, in 2017. This met with no objections from the Ministry of the Environment or, at first, the president’s National Economic Council (CENA). With the council’s unanimous approval at the end of March of a 20-year rental agreement at  $1.7 million per year for about half of the island’s nearly 75 hectares. On or adjacent to these nearly 35 hectares there would be three berths for post-panamax ships to refuel, eight semi-buried fuel tanks, a helicopter pad, a weather monitoring station and buildings to house employees. The first two years of rent would be waived.

But Comptroller General Federico Humbert found that the papers were not in order — right in the middle of a declared marine animal migration corridor and no environmental study of that, and in any case an unacceptably low rent. President Varela chimed in, objecting that it was a bad deal for Panama with many of the irregularities that critics had been citing. In the legislature there was a move to declare the island a protected wildlife sanctuary, which would put an end to the project.

But in the week after this, environmentalists complained, the company began to fell trees in the island. In the mad late-April rush to pass things before the legislative session ended, the sanctuary proposal was taken off the agenda. Some critics point at former PRD legislator and current National Assembly secretary general Franz Wever for that move.

In any case the session ended and CIAM et al were pressing for the sanctuary proposal’s inclusion on a special session agenda. And less than a week after the regular session’s end, the voters threw Ramón Ramos out as mayor, effective July 1.

Ramos, insisting that a deposit has been paid, maintains that the project must go ahead. Varela has punted the issue to the next administration, which may be dealing with a denuded half an island before it can take up the matter. So CIAM is calling Varela to issue a decree to stall things in the meantime.

Where is Cortizo at about this issue, or actually, any environmental issue at all. In his and his Democratic Revolutionary Party (PRD) campaign he scrupulously avoided any mention of environmental issues, including climate change. But Mayor Ramos is Cambio Democratico, so there would be no obvious partisan imperative to uphold the project. What payments or assurances come into play, and whether the Israeli government insists on a contract signed by one of its citizens, those matters remain undisclosed if they exist.

 

These links are interactive — click on the boxes

 

npp

 

npp

 

vote final

 

npp

 

FB_2

 

Tweet