Panama rentals
   
News | Economy | Culture | Opinion | Lifestyle | Nature
Noticias | Opiniones | Alternativa con Miguel Antonio Bernal
Archive | Unclassified Ads | Front Page and Update Links
Volume 18, Number 3
April 11, 2012

Panama Spanish Schools in Bocas del Toro and in Boquete, by the beach and in the mountains


news

Also in this section:
Chaplain warns that police are prone to politics
United States facing bold new calls for "Drug War" alternatives
PRD ready to rumble --- with each other
Martinelli's Easter Tweet
Can the Panamanian women's vote be alienated?
New threats to expropriate Casco Viejo properties
Constitutional chess game leaves many unanswered questions
Cops dismiss importance of Calle Uruguay gun play
Is FARC's insurgency winding down? What might that mean for Panama?
Fear, loathing and electoral love in Mexico
New World Bank president: what's on the agenda?
Is MOLIRENA about to split into three?
Suspense about an animal cruelty law
Farrar approved as the next American ambassador here
Clash between loggers and Wounaan community leaves two dead
Atlantic Side bridge plans indicate further moves
A proposal to purge the courts and bring in Martinelista replacements
A de facto police coup, even if Martinelli lingers on
Partial agreement sets off furious rows in the left and the comarca


Shooting up Calle Uruguay: police say it never happened



Mi Panama Transparente is a project, mainly a website, started by some of the corporate mainstream media, journalist groups and citizen anti-crime groups as a response to the manipulated crime statistics and culture of denial about what goes on in the streets of Panama. They serve as a clearinghouse for people to report crimes and disturbances of the peace, so that these can be quantified and documented. They also share skills about the reporting on these matters, both among professional journalists and also with citizen observers.

Calle Uruguay is Panama City's main club district, notorious for its loud and unruly scene until the wee hours of many a morning. The country's "Ley Zanahoria" --- a play on words that literally means "carrot law" but also sounds like a contraction for "ley zana horaria" (healthy hours law) and is a mandatory closing hour for establishments that sell alcoholic beverages --- was largely instituted so that people who live along Calle Uruguay can get some sleep.

At about two in the morning of Saturday, March 17, Mi Panama Transparente was conducting a workshop on Calle Uruguay, wherein people were learning how to measure the sound decibels on the street and properly document their findings. They happened upon a wild and frightening shooting scene, which sent people running for cover and brought in the police. Apparently nobody was hit by any bullets. Some of the folks apparently involved had a discussion with the cops, after which they got into their BMW and were escorted out of the area.

Later, the police denied that the incident had ever happened. Just another weekend on Calle Uruguay, where people who drive BMWs enjoy certain special privileges and immunities and the neighbors have to put up with it.






    

Also in this section:
Chaplain warns that police are prone to politics
United States facing bold new calls for "Drug War" alternatives
PRD ready to rumble --- with each other
Martinelli's Easter Tweet
Can the Panamanian women's vote be alienated?
New threats to expropriate Casco Viejo properties
Constitutional chess game leaves many unanswered questions
Cops dismiss importance of Calle Uruguay gun play
Is FARC's insurgency winding down? What might that mean for Panama?
Fear, loathing and electoral love in Mexico
New World Bank president: what's on the agenda?
Is MOLIRENA about to split into three?
Suspense about an animal cruelty law
Farrar approved as the next American ambassador here
Clash between loggers and Wounaan community leaves two dead
Atlantic Side bridge plans indicate further moves
A proposal to purge the courts and bring in Martinelista replacements
A de facto police coup, even if Martinelli lingers on
Partial agreement sets off furious rows in the left and the comarca



© 2012 by Eric Jackson
All Rights Reserved - Todos Derechos Reservados
Individual contributors retain the rights to their articles or photos

email: editor@thepanamanews.com or

e_l_jackson_malo@yahoo.com or

thepanamanews@gmail.com

phone: (507) 6-632-6343

Mailing address:

Eric Jackson
att'n The Panama News
Apartado 0831-00927 Estafeta Paitilla
Panamá, República de Panamá

Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/thepanamanews